New and expanded digital collections

The Digital Projects Team would like to alert you to several new and expanded digital collections that are now available from the University Libraries:

  • Greensboro Pictorials Collection:  http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/GSOPics.php
    This collection features seven pictorial books documenting local businesses and institutions in Greensboro and Central North Carolina in the early part of the Twentieth Century. This was a collaboration with the Greensboro Historical Museum.
  • Greensboro Patriot: http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/GSOPatriot.php
    Working with the Lyrasis Mass Digitization Collaborative, we are placing 4600 issues of a Greensboro weekly newspaper dating from 1826 to 1922 online. Currently, issues through 1888 are available. The remainder should be online within the next two to three months.
  • The Carolinian: http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/Carolinian.php
    Phase II of this project will add issues of UNCG's newspaper from 1930-2005. Issues through 1956 are currently available online, while the remainder should be available by May. This project was also completed through the Lyrasis Mass Digitization Collaborative.
In addition, new material has been added to the following collections:

Please take a few moments to look at some of these collections and let me know if you encounter any problems or have any questions.

There will be many more items coming online in the next couple of months, including the Physical Education Pamphlets Collection, selections from the Bernard Greenhouse Collection, an exhibit featuring records from WUAG, our campus radio station, and our NC ECHO-funded North Carolina Runaway Slave Advertisements project.

In addition, we hope to be moving to an upgraded version of the CONTENTdm software within two months. This should provide an enhanced user experience and a cleaner interface.

All our digital collections can be viewed at this link: http://libcdm1.uncg.edu/.

1 comments :: New and expanded digital collections

  1. Greensboro Patriot database is a wonderful tool for local history. Nice work!

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